Final Destination 3 Review (2006)


My History With the Film:
I was a big fan of the first two Final Destinations, but by the time the third one was released I was a little burned out. I remember renting the DVD and within the first few minutes I knew I wasn’t in the mood to watch it. I made it up until the first death scene (post the premonition scene) and I turned the film off and went on to do something else.

In February of 2018, I decided that I wanted to finish my rewatch of the series and this time watch every film completely. I started up Final Destination 3, this time with a much better attitude and found myself enjoying the film quite a bit. I like the pacing and the consistency of this franchise and Final Destination 3 is a decent entry.

What The Film Is About (Non-Spoiler):
A young woman has a premonition of a rollercoaster causing the death of her classmates. When she flips out, she is removed from the ride along with several others who Death now must track down and finish the job. 

What I Liked About It:
-What’s not to love about the crazy death scenes? Even if you dislike the Final Destination series, you gotta love the death scenes. They are realistic in a Darwin Awards type of way, and it makes watching these movies a lot of fun. 

-I love that this film used a rollercoaster as the big event that affects the rest of the plot. I personally do not like rollercoasters, and like they said in the movie, it’s all because of control. I do not like not being in control. Put a steering wheel and some breaks on a rollercoaster, and I’ll ride it all day, but strap me into something and make me hold for the ride, no thank you. 

-There is a scene where death attempts to catch up with a couple of our survivors while sitting in a drive thru at a fast food joint. In terms of a Final Destination death scene, this is quite tame, but there is something about it that has bothered me long after my viewing. While sitting in a drive thru, I'm usually relax and not totally observant to my surroundings. I think this scene tapped into that and then showed you how easy it would be to be rendered defenseless and at the mercy of the other objects around you.

What I Didn't Like About It:
-Overall, I feel like the death scenes were weaker in this entry than the previous two. ::SPOILERS:: The tanning bed is something I’m sure everyone has thought of, and it helps fulfill this morbid fantasy/fear that we all have. I don’t ride rollercoasters nor do I tan, so I couldn’t relate to these two deaths nearly as much as some of the other ones featured in this franchise. ::END SPOILERS::

-The cast does a serviceable job, but it really does feel like we were stuck with the B team. I’m a huge fan of Amanda Crew, and I thought she did well, but no one really had a break out performance. All of the characters felt like random teenager fodder and the script didn’t really offer the characters much to do or say.
Additional Notes:
-Tony Todd (the mortician in the first two films) provided the voice for the subway operator and the devil above the entrance of the rollercoaster. The roller-coaster used was “The Corkscrew” at Playland in Vancouver, Canada. The ride is actually slower and tamer, but CGI was used to add loops and multiple corkscrew sections.
-The cast had to ride the roller coaster twenty-six times in one night to get the footage for the opening scene.
-Mary Elizabeth Winstead (Wendy) and Crystal Lowe (Ashlyn) starred in the remake of Black Christmas, along with Kristen Cloke who played Valerie Lewton in the original Final Destination.
-The truck that pins Wendy and Kevin in at the drive-thru is the same truck from Final Destination 2. In Final Destination 2, the truck says “Drink Responsibly” but then the driver is drinking from a bottle and Kimberly and her friends point out how ironic that is. 
Notable Horror Connections:
  • Chelan Simmons: See No Evil 2, Carrie (2002), Tucker and Dale vs. Evil, and IT (1990).
  • Jesse Moss: Ginger Snaps, The Uninvited, and Tucker and Dale vs. Evil.
  • Mary Elizabeth Winstead: 10 Cloverfield Lane, Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter, The Thing (2011), The Ring Two, and Black Christmas.
  • Ryan Merriman: The Ring Two and Halloween Resurrection.
  • Amanda Crew: The Haunting in Connecticut
  • Kris Lemche: Ginger Snaps
Rating:
I stand by the fact that the Final Destination series may be the scariest horror series. The villain is Death, who is unbeatable, and always gets his man/woman. It’s the one villain that we will all face in life, one way or another, and that makes these films troubling. With that being said, the execution of these films is fun. The death scenes are over-the-top and the tension can be wonderful. I feel like this particular film is the laziest of the first three movies, and doesn’t really try too hard. It sticks to the formula that works, channels the same story we’re used to, and then ends. That’s not to say its not an enjoyable ride, but the film feels like a cheap cash in.
Of the first three Final Destinations that I’ve reviewed, part three is very skippable. It’s not a bad film, it just doesn’t live up to the expectations of the first two films. I’d say Final Destination 3 is healthy two and a half out of five, and is a worthy watch to complete the entire series, but as a standalone film it should be skipped.

Scream on DVD, Blu-Ray, and Laser Disc Releases

I’ve already broken down the various Scream releases on VHS and thought I’d take a look at the DVD, Blu-Ray, and laser disc release history now. Scream has been released and re-released several times over the years, but sadly has never truly had an perfect release containing all the bonus features and unrated cut. The only thing we can hope for is that Scream Factory will eventually get their hands on the franchise, but until then, here are your North American choices.

Note: I'm only looking at the first Scream film in this article. In combo packs I will not break down extras or discuss the sequels included. I may tackle them in another post at a later date.

Scream DVD (1997)

Theatrical R-Rated Version
Extras:
-Audio Commentary with Wes Craven and Kevin Williamson
-Red band trailer

This was the original release from 1997. It’s pretty bare bones with just a commentary track and trailer. You can tell it’s the 1997 edition because of the purple widescreen logo across the artwork.


 Scream DVD (1998) Cover 1

Theatrical R-Rated Version
Extras:
-Audio Commentary with Wes Craven and Kevin Williamson
-Original Promo Featurette (6 Minutes)
-Two Short Featurettes ("On the Scream Set" and "Drew Barrymore") (3 Minutes)
-Q&A with the Cast ("What's your favorite scary movie?" and "Why are people so fascinated by horror films?" (5 minutes)
-Special Effects Gallery
-Cast and Crew Bios
-Trivia
-Two Trailers, Seven TV spots, and Stills Gallery

I have not actually seen a Scream DVD without the Widescreen banner or the Collector's Series logo, so I'm not 100% convinced this DVD exists. However, several sites online suggest that it does, so I've decided to include it for the time being.

This version (along with the 1998 Collector's Series) are identical with the only different being the artwork.



Scream DVD (1998) Cover 2

Theatrical R-Rated Version
Extras:
-Audio Commentary with Wes Craven and Kevin Williamson
-Original Promo Featurette (6 Minutes)
-Two Short Featurettes ("On the Scream Set" and "Drew Barrymore") (3 Minutes)
-Q&A with the Cast ("What's your favorite scary movie?" and "Why are people so fascinated by horror films?" (5 minutes)
-Special Effects Gallery
-Cast and Crew Bios
-Trivia
-Two Trailers, Seven TV spots, and Stills Gallery

This version includes the Collector’s Series band across the top of the artwork. This disc will be reused throughout the different bundles as you'll see below.

 
Ultimate Scream Edition DVD (2000)

Theatrical R-Rated Version
Extras:
-Audio Commentary with Wes Craven and Kevin Williamson
-Behind the Scream documentary (30 minutes)
-Scream Outakes
-Cast Screen tests (Neve Campbell, Skeet Ulrich, and Jamie Kennedy)
-An Editing Game featuring Cotton Weary's Apartment
-Fictional Trailers from Sunrise Studios (the makers of Stab)
-DVD-ROM: Screen saver, screenplay, and trivia game
-Original Promo Featurette (6 Minutes)
-Two Short Featurettes ("On the Scream Set" and "Drew Barrymore") (3 Minutes)
-Q&A with the Cast ("What's your favorite scary movie?" and "Why are people so fascinated by horror films?" (5 minutes)
-Special Effects Gallery
-Cast and Crew Bios
-Trivia
-Two Trailers, Seven TV spots, and Stills Gallery

This is a four disc set that combines the 1998 Collector's Series disc with the Scream 2 and 3 Collector's Editions. There is a fourth disc that is full of bonus features not found on any other set. See the highlighted extras above that exclusive to this set.


Scream DVD Triple Pack (2009)
 

Theatrical R-Rated Version
Extras:
-Audio Commentary with Wes Craven and Kevin Williamson
-Original Promo Featurette (6 Minutes)
-Two Short Featurettes ("On the Scream Set" and "Drew Barrymore") (3 Minutes)
-Q&A with the Cast ("What's your favorite scary movie?" and "Why are people so fascinated by horror films?" (5 minutes)
-Special Effects Gallery
-Cast and Crew Bios
-Trivia
-Two Trailers, Seven TV spots, and Stills Gallery

This includes the 1998 Collector’s Series bundled alongside the Scream 2 and 3 Collector's Series. There are no additional features or extras.



Scream DVD Triple Feature (2011)

Theatrical R-Rated Version
-Audio Commentary with Wes Craven and Kevin Williamson
-Original Promo Featurette (6 Minutes)
-Two Short Featurettes ("On the Scream Set" and "Drew Barrymore") (3 Minutes)
-Q&A with the Cast ("What's your favorite scary movie?" and "Why are people so fascinated by horror films?" (5 minutes)
-Special Effects Gallery
-Cast and Crew Bios
-Trivia
-Two Trailers, Seven TV spots, and Stills Gallery

The Scream DVD Triple Feature from 2011 is identical to the 2009 Triple Pack. It uses the same 1998 Collector's Series DVD with the same extras. The only major difference is the packaging which this time combines all three movies into one standard size amaray case.

 
Scream 1-4 Pack (2018)

Theatrical R-Rated Version
Extras:
-Probably the same as the Collector's Edition, but I'm not 100% sure.
 
The Scream 1-4 Pack is the latest in Scream DVD releases having been released in January 2018. It's the only release in the United States to include all four Scream films in one collection. No extra features are listed on the back of the box and I haven't been able to confirm exactly what discs are in this particular set, but I'd assume its still the same Collector's Edition disc that was used in all the other releases. I don't see anyone going out of their way to make a new Scream DVD in 2018 for a budget set.



Scream Blu Ray (2011)

Theatrical R-Rated Version
Extras:
-Audio Commentary with Wes Craven and Kevin Williamson
-Original Promo Featurette (6 Minutes)
-Two Short Featurettes ("On the Scream Set" and "Drew Barrymore") (3 Minutes)
-Q&A with the Cast ("What's your favorite scary movie?" and "Why are people so fascinated by horror films?" (5 minutes)
-Trailers and TV spots

The Blu ray omits the cast and crew bios and the special effects gallery seen on previous DVD releases. All of the features are presented in standard definition and there are no new features on the disc. The biggest selling point for the blu ray is that this is the first time the film is presented in anamorphic widescreen. All of the previous releases were non-anamorphic


Scream 5 Film Set Blu Ray (2011)
 
Theatrical R-Rated Version
Extras:
-Audio Commentary with Wes Craven and Kevin Williamson
-Documentary: Still Screaming (90 minutes)
-Documentary: Scream: The Inside Story (90 minutes)
-Original Promo Featurette (6 Minutes)
-Two Short Featurettes ("On the Scream Set" and "Drew Barrymore") (3 Minutes)
-Q&A with the Cast ("What's your favorite scary movie?" and "Why are people so fascinated by horror films?" (5 minutes)
-Trailers and TV spots

This Blu ray set includes the same disc included in the standard Scream Blu ray. Also included are Scream 2 and 3, and two documentaries found on separate discs (thus the Five Film set title.) Scream 4 is not included and I'm sure this poorly worded title has fooled people into thinking they were buying all four films.

The two documentaries (Still Screaming and Scream: The Inside Story) are not found on any other release outside of this package.

None of the extra features from the "Ultimate Scream Edition" are included.




Scream Laserdisc (1997)
 

Unrated Director’s Cut
Extras:
-Audio Commentary with Wes Craven and Kevin Williamson

The biggest reason to own the Scream laserdisc is that this is the best looking format to see the unrated director's cut since it never made its way onto DVD in the United States. The only other place to find it is the collector's edition VHS tapes which had the unrated cut by accident.

It's obvious the commentary track was recorded for the laserdisc because it mentions it being the unrated cut. However, this commentary track made its way onto all the DVD releases which were R rated.

What makes the commentary track really interesting is that it was recorded before Kevin Williamson's career took off with Dawson's Creek, so he comes across very humble and almost fanboyish.



Scream Laserdisc (1998)

Unrated Director’s Cut
Extras:
-Audio Commentary with Wes Craven and Kevin Williamson

The only difference in this laserdisc from the previous laserdisc is an added DTS track.

As you can see there is no true "ultimate package" when it comes to Scream. If you want to experience Scream and all the features you would need to pick up a laserdisc for the unrated cut, then buy the Ultimate Scream DVD set so that you get the bonus disc full of features, and then buy the five disc Blu-ray set so you can watch the film in its best presentation and also enjoy the two documentaries.

Some Changes in the Format

Last week, I posted a blog entitled Scream on VHS. It was a chronological look at the first Scream film as released on VHS. I was researching this for my own self-interest, but I decided to post it to save others the headache of trying to find this information. I didn't expect to have so much fun researching and writing this particular post, but I did. It was great taking a look at some of the lesser talked about horror history, so I've decided to do a little more of it.

Since the launch of this site back in September of last year, I've posted my simple, no spoiler reviews a few times a month and nothing else. I've decided I want that to change. My reviews will remain being posted each month, but I also plan on posting a variety of different horror themed posts that focus on the lesser discussed/lesser known horror properties/movies/merchandise. The first wave to these posts will be discussing the home video release schedule of the entire Scream franchise and will evolve from there.

I'm also doing some visual upgrades throughout the site, you may have noticed the recent reviews listing on the sidebar. I decide to utilize images from the posters/DVDs to give it more of that video store feel. I know I associate a lot of my horror with the VHS/DVD boxes and wanted to give the site a little bit of that vibe.

But that's not all! In the very near future, I plan on launching the pilot episode of 90's Horror Review podcast. This podcast is currently planned as a single person podcast that will act as a companion piece to this blog. I plan on doing an episode to accompany each review that will recap the written review, along with expanding on my thoughts regarding the film. I'm planning these to be short 10-20 minute episodes, which the occasional longer franchise overview podcasts as well. When I dig into a franchise or a favorite movie, I hope to invite some of my friends who podcast to join in and help break down the film.

I mentioned that this is a pilot episode and I say this with complete honesty. I want to create a pilot that will give me some time to experiment and test out my rusty podcast editing techniques and see how much time and effort will need to go into this endeavor. I don't have much experience podcasting alone, so this may not work, and I'm okay with that. I just want to give it a try and see where things go from there. The blog is my priority, the podcast is an afterthought for the time being.

I hope you enjoy the new content coming your way.

Scream on VHS

This past weekend, I went thrift store shopping and ran across a VHS tape containing an audio commentary of Scream by Kevin Williamson and Wes Craven.

I was flabbergasted. In all my years of buying, collecting, and renting video cassettes, I’d never seen this particular tape, nor had I ever seen an audio commentary on VHS. Once I got home, I hopped online to unravel this mystery and I struggled to find any real info on this tape or any pictures. There were no listings on Etsy or Ebay and I could only find brief mentions on old DVD or horror movie forums.

Ultimately, I ran across an archived Geocities site from 1998 that helped break down all the ways that Scream was released on VHS and between that site and some random forum threads I was finally able to piece together the release history of Scream on VHS. I thought I’d put together a breakdown here at 90sHorrorReview to make it easier for horror fans to find. 

Scream was released for sale on VHS on December 2nd, 1997 almost a year after it reached theaters. I was unable to pin down the exact date that Scream was released in video stores for rent, but I’m pretty sure it was closer to June or July 1997. Back in the 90’s, VHS tapes were not released for sale on the same date of release like DVDs and Blu-rays are. Rental stores often had a six month exclusive for movies before the general public got their shot at owning it.

Scream Demo/Screener Tape (1997)
 
Back in the days of video stores, movie companies would send out "screener" tapes to the stores prior to a movie being released on video. The idea behind this was it was a way to convince the video store owner to buy more tapes and/or to allow employees to pre-screen movies so they could get excited and recommend the film to incoming customers.


Regular Version (1997)

This tape was identical to the rental copy. It used the movie’s poster for artwork and included no extras. It was a simple barebones release like most VHS tapes.


 Regular Version with Behind the Scenes Featurette (1997)

The regular “for sale” version looked very similar to the rental version, but it contained a red badge at the bottom left that said, “Includes Exclusive Behind-the-Scenes Scream Featurette!” After the movie finished, there was a short featurette that discussed the film. It was run of the mill marketing stuff.



Wide Screen Edition (1997)

This version of VHS is identical to the Regular Version w/ Behind the Scenes Featurette, but was presented in widescreen, something that was not all that common in 1997.


Accidental Director’s Cut (1997)

Miramax put out three special covers that went by the corresponding character names: Casey Becker, Sidney Prescott, or Gale Weathers package. This tape included the Behind the Scenes Featurette found on the Regular Version, but it also contained a director’s cut of the film. There was some controversy behind this because Scream was originally rated NC-17 and had to make cuts to reach the R rating. This was not advertised on the tape and it wasn’t supposed to be on there. The director’s cut consists mostly of extended scenes with the most notable being an extended shot of Steve’s guts spilling out.



The Deluxe Edition (1997)

The Deluxe Edition included the Wide Screen Edition tape as described above complete with the Behind the Scenes Featurette. Also included was a second tape of the film in widescreen but this time the audio was replaced by a commentary track recorded by writer Kevin Williamson and director Wes Craven. The package also contained three collectible cards (I believe with the three covers from the director’s cut: Casey Becker, Sidney Prescott, and Gale Weathers) and a ten minute pre-paid calling card. It retailed for around $35 and was made in limited quantities.

The Haunting Review (1999)

 

My History With the Film:
In the 90’s, Hollywood had a tendency to release movies with a similar plot within the same year of each other. Godzilla and The Lost World both opened in 1998, as well as Armageddon and Deep Impact. In 1999, Hollywood decided to release two haunted mansion movies: The House on Haunted Hill and The Haunting. 

Based on the marketing, I was way more excited for The Haunting than The House on Haunted Hill. The Haunting was directed by Jan de Bont, director of Speed and Twister, two of the 90’s biggest hits. The film featured cutting edge special effects and the incredibly popular Catherine Zeta Jones, fresh off The Mask of Zorro and Entrapment. The Haunting was one of many films I anticipated in 1999 and I found myself in a theater opening weekend to see the big payoff. What I found wasn’t exactly what I expected, but I still enjoyed myself enough to pick it up on DVD a few months later. I revisited The Haunting two or three times, before forgetting about the movie altogether.

The House on Haunted Hill was a significantly better film and a movie I’ve watched at least a dozen times. When I think of late 90’s ghost stories, I think of that, not The Haunting. It wasn’t until maybe a year ago, when my wife was describing a movie with creepy children’s heads built into the furniture that I finally remembered The Haunting even existed. It’s not a movie you see streaming all that often and is definitely not one discussed much in the horror community.

What The Film Is About (Non-Spoiler):
Three insomniacs are invited to spend a few nights in a creepy mansion under the guise of finding new treatment for insomnia, when in fact they are being studied for the effect of group fear.

What I Liked About It:
-The house and production design are fantastic. The house used in this film is amazing. It looks gothic, medieval, scary, and massive. In a way, it epitomizes everything I think about when I think of a haunted mansion. It has a giant fireplace that you can walk into, creepy passages, hidden doors, and is large enough to get lost in. 

-The filmmakers used the CGI well in this film. Some of it looks a little dated (especially the ending), but when using it for subtle scares it works wonders. The use of curtains, moving statues, and my favorite, the arches in the bedroom turning into menacing eyes, is very well done and holds up well almost twenty years later. It should come to no one’s surprise that Industrial Light and Magic did quite a bit of it. It should be noted that upon its release, critics panned the use of CGI not because of it being bad, but for using it too much. Of course, compared to modern movies, the CGI is used sparingly and doesn’t detract too much from what is on the screen.

-I love films that use an illness or addiction as a plot point because it always keeps the viewer on their toes. Is this real or is this a result of the insomnia? Is the experiment about fear going too far and taking advantage of this young and vulnerable woman? These thoughts filled my mind as I watched this movie unfold and I believe this constant questioning helped with my enjoyment of the film.

-Lily Taylor’s (Nell) performance is the standout performance in this film. I’ve honestly never seen a role she’s bad in, and although she isn’t the most likeable protagonist, she does a great job creating a believable character that is scarred from years of emotional abuse and looking for something to believe in and someone to take care of. Sadly, her character is not well written and by the end of the film you are sick of her.

What I Didn't Like About It:
-Individually, I really like this cast. Liam Nesson, Catherine Zeta Jones, and Owen Wilson have all shown they are capable of creating some memorable and captivating roles. Unfortunately, none of that is here. All three characters are pretty one-dimensional and Owen Wilson feels really out of place. 

-The movie fails to create a creepy atmosphere despite the amazing production design. Everything looks like it should be scary, but outside of one scene (the house having eyes) it fails tremendously. There is no tension or dread to be found in this film.

-I feel like the script went in for a slow burn, but it doesn’t work. The movie moves way too slow, nothing really happens, and none of the characters are interesting enough to care about. The ending also sucks.

-::SPOILER:: The plot jumps in and out of a very interesting idea (a powerful rich man is obsessed with having children and taking care of children, and possibly even killing children). Sadly, the plot ends up bogged down with Nell’s relation to Crane and why she is linked to these children and it all falls apart. No real explanation is given for why Crane wanted children and why he neglected or killed them nor why he still roams this house. I guess the argument is that Crane’s spirit is what kept he children trapped, but it’s pretty damn far reaching, especially when you start talking about the big door depicting purgatory and its role in all of this. Let’s face it, the ending is a damn mess and just doesn’t work.

-I believe in the script there was an attempt to use purgatory as a theme, but it fails horribly. 

-::SPOILER:: Early on in the film, Dr. Marrow’s assistant almost loses an eye thanks to Crane’s spirit, and his second assistant takes her to the hospital, but never returns. It’s almost as if the character was created just to drive this girl to the hospital so Marrow didn’t have to leave the house.

-The Dudleys (Bruce Dern and Marian Seldes) play caretakers who you initially believe are in on the whole experiment. I turns out they aren’t, but the characters don’t serve any real purpose. Apparently, the shooting script involved several more scenes with The Dudleys which did not make it into the movie and may have provided some context and depth for their characters.

Additional Notes:
-The house is located in Grantham, England and is owned by The University of Evansville (Indiana). It’s used by the students who study abroad. Some of the interiors were shot in Harlaxton Manor in England and some of the sets were built inside the hangar that Howard Hughes housed The Spruce Goose. 

-The original title was going to the title of the novel, The Haunting of Hill House, but with House on Haunted Hill releasing the same year, they decided to shorten it to The Haunting to avoid confusion.

-Real recordings of creaks and moans were played throughout the house to get a natural reaction from the actors.

-The script was plagued by production issues or at least rumors of production issues. A script doctor was brought in to clean up the script and did an uncredited re-write. The cinematographer quit partially though the shoot. Several scenes shown in Behind the Scenes Specials and trailers never made it into the film. And there is even a rumor that Steven Spielberg (whose company Dreamworks distributed the film) directed some scenes or participated in post-production because he wasn’t a fan of the rough cut. This was never confirmed.

-The tagline for this film is “Some house are born bad” which is a line used in Stephen King’s Rose Red mini-series. King wrote the first script for The Haunting, but after some creative differences with Steven Spielberg, he took that script and made Rose Red. 

-Another big name attached to this film was director Wes Craven, who dropped out to work on Scream.

Rating:
The Haunting is a mess of a film, which is surprising considering the cast and the director. It’s supposed to be a ghost story, but it offers very little in scares, ghosts, and tension. Outside of the amazing house there really is nothing worth seeing in this film. I now know why I forgot this film even existed. 

In order to fix this film, you need a ton of editing, a coherent script, Liam Neeson to give a damn, the characters to actually have purpose, and a much, much better ending. 

I tend to look back on the films I review here with rose colored glasses, but even glasses can’t make this stinker look better than it actually is. The Haunting is a two out of five for me and can be skipped. If you want a 90’s ghost movie, pick up its 1999 competitor, The House of Haunted Hill. You’ll enjoy it more than this film.

Not the 90’s - 1922 Review (2017)


My History With the Film: 
It’s been talked about again and again, but 2017 was a huge year for Stephen King adaptations. Movies like IT, Gerald’s Game, Mr. Mercedes, The Dark Tower, and 1922 were released. 1922 is a Netflix horror release that was announced just a few short weeks before its debut. It stars Thomas Jane (The Mist) and Molly Parker (Deadwood) and is an adaptation of a novella by Stephen King.

I was only vaguely familiar with the 1922 book, and had no idea what it was about. The trailer gave a pretty good look at a creepy story set in 1922, so I decided to give it a shot. I watched it the weekend it came out in October 2017.

What The Film Is About (Non-Spoiler):
 In 1922, a man and his son kill his wife and suffer the consequences afterwards.

What I Liked About It:
-This is a slow, character driven story in which the entire plot revolves around Thomas Jane’s character, Wilfred James. I think Jane did a good job with the material and brought to life this old fashioned farmer who makes a bad decision and is tortured by it.

-Molly Parker is wonderful in what little scene time that she gets.

-Because of the slow burn, when scary things start happening, they are quite effective.

-The movie feels like it’s truly lived in. The house doesn’t feel like a set at all, but an actual home where somebody lives with its faults and all.

What I Didn’t Like About It:
-This movie is based on a novella, which I’m sure Stephen King wrote because he didn’t feel there was enough material for an entire novel. This story doesn’t contain enough material for an entire movie either. This would have made a great one hour long Twilight Zone episode or Tales from The Crypt, but not a movie. It drags way too long and is not strong enough to support the 101 minute run time.

-I felt like Thomas Jane’s accent was good, but not great. Sometimes it slipped into mumbling territory and I ended up switching the subtitles on just to make sure I didn’t miss anything.

Additional Notes:
 -Thomas Jane starred in two other Stephen King adaptations: The Mist and Dreamcatcher.

Rating:
1922 plays out like Stephen King’s version of The Tell-Tale Heart. It’s a slow piece about a man terrorized by his own guilt. I feel like the filmmaker tried to channel the slow burn that worked so well in The Witch, but I don’t think it worked as effectively here. Thomas Jane did a wonderful job and really brought to life his character, but ultimately there wasn’t enough in the script to keep my interest for the entire movie.

I’d rate 1922 a two and a half out to five and say skip it unless you are a big Stephen King fan or a fan of slow burn horror flicks.